Southwell town councillor Mr Peter Harris stands over yellow lines that have been painted with the wrong shade of yellow (left) and, right, with lines that were laid with the correct, more subtle shade
Southwell town councillor Mr Peter Harris stands over yellow lines that have been painted with the wrong shade of yellow (left) and, right, with lines that were laid with the correct, more subtle shade

Double yellow lines have been painted too wide and in the wrong shade of yellow, to the anger of a town council.

The road markings in Southwell were laid to a width of 100mm and in daffodil yellow.

As the lines are in the town’s conservation area, they should be painted a more subtle primrose yellow and to half the width.

Southwell Town Council has raised the issue with Via East Midlands, Nottinghamshire Coun-ty Council’s highways contractor, as the lines in the conservation area have been incorrectly painted twice.

Mr Peter Harris, a member of the town council, said: “They did it the wrong way 13 years ago and have got it wrong again.

“Someone needs to be held accountable.

“We have previously written to Via about the colour and width of yellow lines in a conservation area, so a senior manager is aware. But they have been painted incorrectly again.”

Council chairman Andy Gregory said: “The town council is not happy with the work that has been done.

“We are having on-going discussions with both Via and Nottinghamshire County Council to get the problem resolved.”

Mrs Suzanne Heydon, head of network management at Via East Midlands, said there had been a meeting.

'Refurbished in primrose yellow'

“It was agreed the lines would be refurbished in primrose yellow, a more subtle shade than the standard yellow,” she said.

“But the lines would be maintained at their previous width (because) the process of removing thermoplastic lining involves heating the material, which can cause the road surface under the lining to deteriorate and the lining to look unsightly.

“The agreement reached following the site meeting will ensure the lining around the town is appropriate and enforceable.

“We are continuing to work with the town council to address its concerns and expectations.”

Conservation areas were first introduced in 1967 to preserve locations of special architectural or historical interest.

As part of the guidelines, lighter double yellow lines are designed to be less intrusive and permission needs to be granted by a local council before alterations can be made to buildings, roads or footpaths.

There are more than 8,000 conservation areas in England.